New York Tint Law 2021 (Ny)

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NEW YORK TINT LAW 2021 (NY) | New York law requires specific tinting for your car windows. This page has all of the information your need. You can find out what percentage of darkness or reflective quality it needs to have in order not to break any laws with New York’s standards!

The New York window tint law was first put into place in 1991 with it being the 14th state to enact these laws.

NEW YORK TINT LAW 2021 (NY)

WHAT DOES VLT MEAN ACCORDING TO NEW YORK STATE LAW

The percentage of light that a window tint film passes through your car windows is called the VLT (Visible Light Transmission). Each state has different legal limits. The amount allowed in New York for Passengers vehicles is very specific to their regulations. However multi-Purpose vehicle occupants can be protected by any level they choose!

A HIGHER VLT means that more light is allowed to pass through the tinted window film.
The higher a Tint Percentage, the less darkness you get on movie night.  Your visibility will be improved with other drivers on street at night time!

NEW YORK TINT LAW 2021 (NY)
Alabama Tint Law

LEGAL TINT LIMIT FOR PASSENGER VEHICLES – NEW YORK TINT LAW 

  • Front Windshield: Must allow more than 70% of light in (a non-reflective tint with any darkness can be used on top 6 inches).
  • Front-seat side windows: up to 70% tint darkness allowed
  • Back seat side windows: Any tint darkness can be used if using dual exterior rearview mirrors.
  • Rear window: Any tint darkness can be used if using dual exterior rearview mirrors.

LEGAL TINT LIMIT FOR MULTI-PURPOSE VEHICLES – NEW YORK TINT LAW 

  • Front Windshield: Window must allow more than 70% of light in (a non-reflective tint with any darkness on top 6 inches).
  • Front side windows: Must allow 20% tint darkness
  • Back seat side windows: Must Allow any tint darkness
  • Rear window: Must Allow any tint darkness

NEW YORK TINT LAW 2021 (NY)

OTHER NEW YORK WINDOW TINT LAW RULES AND REGULATIONS:

New York has a few other important things. You need to think about it. We recommend checking them out first, and here they are:

  • Side mirrors are required in New York if your back window or rear is tinted below 70%.
  • Is it true that colored tint is illegal in New York? All colors allow you’re besides of red and yellow.
  • Do I need a certified sticker from the company installing my window tint in New York? The answer is yes.
  • Is there a way to get a medical exemption for window tint in New York? Yes, the law provides an option.

Tinting laws in New York can change on a daily basis. This website interpreted differently by the DMV or law enforcement agencies of your city. We recommend that you double-check any information for accuracy with local authorities before using it. We are only providing up-to-date info.

The Motor Vehicle Administration offers updates about window tinting regulations every day so keep checking back if anything changes!

NEW YORK WINDOW TINT MEDICAL EXEMPTION REFERENCES

The latest New York Health department regulations have just  updated in December 2017. They include the following medical conditions. Like albinism, chronic actinic dermatitis/actinic reticuloid, dermatomyositis lupus erythematosus porphyria xeroderma pigmentosa severe drug photosensitivity photophobia. Any other condition causing extreme photosensitivities where individuals required by law be shielded from direct rays of sunshine.

STATE OF NEW YORK INFORMATION

New York is a state known for its energetic residential and multinational culture. Home to the Statue of Liberty. It’s an ideal destination with so much history. That you could spend years exploring all it has in store. The people are friendly but careful about their belongings. They’ll stop what they’re doing any time if someone asks for directions or needs help finding something nearby. The architecture reflects both Dutch colonial times and modern skyscrapers. There really isn’t anywhere without some classic New York sightseeing on offer here…

 

Martin John
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